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DROID3 packs qHD display and TI dual-core tip benchmarks

Details of Motorola’s upcoming DROID3 smartphone have been leaked, courtesy of some premature benchmarking of what’s assumed to be a prototype device. According to the stats at Nenamark, spotted by Blog of Mobile, the Verizon Android smartphone will have a qHD 960 x 540 display, just like the Motorola ATRIX, as well as use Imagination Technologies’ PowerVR SGX 540 GPU.

That clears up one lingering question about the DROID3, namely which chipset it would use. Unlike the ATRIX, which is based on NVIDIA’s Tegra 2, it seems Motorola has used the 1GHz Texas Instruments OMAP4430, an alternative dual-core processor.

OS is Gingerbread, at least at time of testing, and the phone scored 45.7 (though, since we’re guessing the firmware isn’t final at this stage, that should probably be taken with a pinch of salt). Other expected specs include a 4-inch display and a front-facing camera for video calls; still unclear is when, exactly, Motorola and Verizon will announce the new QWERTY slider.

[via DROID-Life; via Android Community]

A5 beats Tegra 2 in benchmark tests, thanks to larger size

GLBenchmark pitted a few tablet processors against each other in a speed showdown, and Apple’s custom-designed A5 chip in the iPad 2 handily beats NVIDIA’s Tegra 2 processor, used in competing tablets like the Motorola Xoom. A few analysts are saying that it’s the size that matters in this case — Apple’s chip is more than twice the size of the Tegra 2, and that allows Apple to pull off some better benchmarks, even though the two chips are relatively the same in terms of specifications. Usually, of course, a bigger chip would mess with the design of the overall hardware, but since Apple is doing everything itself, it can afford the extra space and the larger components.

Of course, NVIDIA is set to introduce a Tegra 3 chip later on this year, and that will undoubtedly introduce a new wrinkle to the tablet lineup. Apple no doubt also has its engineers working on faster chips, which means the speed of tablet computing likely still has a long way to progress.

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