Blog Archives

HBO Go now available for iOS, brings over 1,400 shows with it

HBO has finally released their much-awaited HBO Go iOS app for iPhone and iPad devices. The app gives HBO subscribers free access to over 1,400 shows in addition to many sports event and full-length films. What’s great is that the app offers up all of HBO’s quality programming — True Blood, The Sopranos, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Boardwalk Empire, and more — and the app streams over 3G in addition to Wi-Fi. It’s available now in the App Store if you want to get your Nucky Thompson on.

A Half-Baked PlayBook is the tip of the Firmware Nightmare

If there’s one message that comes through loud and clear about the BlackBerry PlayBook – both in our review and in others – it’s that RIM’s first tablet is half-baked in its current state. The 7-inch slate is dependent on a phone for half of its key apps, glitchy in more places than it should be, and has left reviewers warning would-be early-adopters that it might even be too early for them to consider, well, adopting. Welcome to the firmware nightmare, where every device is a work-in-progress and nobody is ever quite satisfied.

The PlayBook is just the latest in a growing number of devices pushed to market before they’re fully cooked, with manufacturers selling us on the promise of what their shiny hardware will do however many months down the line, after they’ve had a chance to similarly buff the software. Motorola’s XOOM is another good example, with a non-functioning memory card slot and missing Flash support at launch, but we’re increasingly seeing it in phones and other devices too.

Once upon a time, we’d buy a phone, live with it – and its stock feature-set – for the length of whatever agreement we’d signed up to, and then upgrade to The Next Big Thing. Now, there’s an expectation that our devices will evolve in features, functionality and stability over time: become better tomorrow than the gadget it is today.

That accelerated software cycle has, however, given manufacturers a green card to release before things are entirely ready. Consumers are treated as beta testers, hooked in with hardware and the promise of what that hardware is capable of, with the firmware to actually make all that a reality delivered somewhere down the ownership line. As our own Vincent Nguyen said, buying RIM’s latest is very similar to buying on credit: “Buy our PlayBook now, and we promise to deliver later.”

On the flip side, meanwhile, there’s a fresh sort of upgrade anxiety, a sense that the next great firmware for our phone, or our tablet, or some other gadget is just around the corner. It’s the new obsession, and it leads to all manner of paranoia when that next update isn’t quite as timely as we’d like it. Most carriers and manufacturers have told me horror stories of frenzied consumers baying frantically for the newest software release, whether that be Gingerbread on their phone or iOS on their tablet. The device you have today – the device you chose to buy in the first place – isn’t good enough any more; it’s a short, if obnoxious step to blaming OEM and network for purposefully undermining your user experience. I know of at least one PR person who, after a disgruntled and impatient smartphone owner managed to discover their direct number, called them repeatedly throughout the day accusing them of deliberately withholding their upgrade.

We’re all complicit – users chasing the holy grail of functionality, manufacturers chasing sales – but I can’t help but think that the pendulum has swung too far. When impatience, our own and that of vendors, shifts us from the occasional glitch to entirely absent apps, when we have hardware proudly mentioned on the spec sheet and yet that we can’t actually use, that’s not future-proofing but a false economy. Give me a device that serves its purpose 100-percent of its life, rather than something I’m expected to coddle until the potential catches up to the promise. In the meantime, I’m going to try to expect less from tomorrow and insist on more – even if that means more moderation – from today.

Tweetbot Twitter client for iOS now available

Tapbot just lifted the veil on Tweetbot, the firm’s newest iOS  Twitterclient. We’ve been using the client for a bit now and it’s definitely pretty versatile; it supports multiple accounts, as well as multiple timelines. So when we wanted to quickly pull up a specific list, we just had to tap the “Timeline” title at the top to quickly switch. The app offers “smart gestures,” too, which means you can triple tap a tweet to reply or swipe a tweet from left to right to view messages you’ve exchanged with that person. As with most Twitter applications, you can post your location, share photos, videos, manage lists, and more. Tweetbot also includes push notifications with support for Boxcar. We like the fast user interface, but wish that it supported active links within the timeline. The app currently forces you to click a tweet and then launch an embedded link. Otherwise we’re pretty pleased with Tweetbot so far. It’s available for $2.99 in the iTunes App Store and is supported on the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. Hit the jump for a link.

Android Market in-app billing enabled: Try-and-Buy apps, extra levels, more

The Android Market has had in-app billing enabled, allowing developers of Android apps to offer upgrades, virtual goods, extra levels in games and other services from within their titles. Using the same checkout system as the Market itself, Google will take the usual 30-percent cut from developers’ proceeds and do all the hard work when it comes to processing. The system will also allow for try-and-buy apps, offering a test period of use and then the ability to unlock the full title rather than having to re-download the app.

 

Google has worked with the developers behind Tap Tap RevengeComicsGun BrosDeer Hunter Challenge HDWSOP3 and Dungeon Defenders: FW Deluxe to demonstrate the in-app billing system, and the updated versions are now available in the Android Market. There are more details for developershere.

[via Android Community]

Notion Ink Adam update delivers bug-sweep; Users delighted [Video]

Notion Ink has released a new firmware update for its Adam tablet, addressing multiple launch issues with the Tegra 2 slate and generally smoothing out the overall user-experience. According to Notion Ink Fan, the Eden UI panels are now more stable, browser tabs are more reliable, and the video player is less jumpy when you toggle play/pause.

Meanwhile, Adam owner Shane Trafford – who you might recall was among the first wave of recipients – has sent in his own video demo of the Notion Ink slate doing its thing (which you can see below).

BMW Connected app hits iOS App Store, ‘Apps’ function hitting vehicles next year

Like son, like father? Evidently that’s exactly how things are playing out, with papa BMW following the footsteps of MINI in the run-up to 2011. Just days after the MINI Connected app found itself situated in the App Store, a BMW Connected app has done likewise. The software itself is free to download, but you’ll need a 6NR-equipped Bimmer to take advantage. From what we can gather, you’ll have to fork out €150 or so for the Apps option, but sadly, there are two costly prerequisites to that: a €3,800 navigation option and a €400 USB interface. In other words, we get the impression that existing BMW owners are out of luck. If you’ve got the magic concoction (available from March 2011), you’ll be able to access web radio stations, hear your Twitter and Facebook updates aloud and control your music via the iDrive setup. That is, until iOS 4.3 goes and breaks compatibility with everything, forever. Joy, joy.

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